Haringey Labour Council – Meet The New Bosses, Same As The Old Bosses?

This piece came to us via one of our comrades in Haringey. We’re reproducing it here as a graphic illustration of what happens when faith is placed in voting and for newly elected councillors to do the right thing – disappointment inevitably follows. Given the estates in question that now face demolition with communities being broken up and residents dispersed far and wide, we suspect anger will be following this disappointment…

There are serious rumblings of discontent within the ranks of Labour Party members/door knockers/vote beggars in Haringey. Through an indicative vote, over 70% of them showed a preference for an anti-HDV (Haringey Development Vehicle) candidate to be selected as leader of the council. Those members were of course completely ignored by the new ‘left-wing’ councillors which proceeded to choose yet another long-term careerist gravy-train rider – one who has a very patchy record on social cleansing and working with developers, Joseph Ejiofor (Business Development Consultant).

The whole anti-HDV campaign was in effect hijacked by the notion that once we get ‘left wing’ councillors, and once previous leader and scab Claire Kober (now working for property developers) and general housing/regeneration Oxbridge tosser Alan Strickland (now working for property developers) had been deposed, those new ‘left wing’ councillors would act with some integrity. They might actually choose to fight for the people that they are supposed to represent – instead of which, surprise surprise, they’ve all turned out to be spineless wankers who will never stand up and fight the government on cuts or ‘regeneration’ or social cleansing. They will never attempt to mobilise the community in defiance of shit Tory policies. They will continue to play the same dog-eared political games.

In the statement about Broadwater Farm, yet more career minded politicians, mouth the same soul-destroying platitudes and use the same empty rhetoric of ‘regeneration’ and ‘consultation’, as used by Strickland and Kober and countless other Labour clones across London.

The HDV campaign never made serious inroads into the affected estates precisely because it was tied to the Labour Party and the Labour Party on the streets of Tottenham and on those estates after decades of managed decline, is a fucking joke. There was a 38.7% turnout at the local elections in Haringey, which means the tiny minority of the electorate who actually voted Labour, handed power to yet more ambitious, inadequate creatures to run our town hall (actually they’ve sold our town hall and it’s going to be ‘re-imagined’ by off-shore developers as a ‘Boutique Hotel’).

That minority of voters gave them the authority to further flog off our property that was fought for over generations, to parasite developers and greedy bastard landlords. They authorised them to privatise and cut the rest of our services, to raise council-tax to unaffordable levels and to give themselves huge pay-rises. The Labour Party have been in power in this borough for more than 60 years and the end result of a one party state, is a despicable pastiche of what a socialist society should look like.

Fuck the cowards at Haringey Labour Council – they have sold, and will continue to sell, their undemocratic, moribund, arses into total obsolescence.

Direct Action. Mutual Aid. Grass Roots Democracy.

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Local authorities wanting to control the narrative

We’ve merged and enhanced a couple of previous posts to come up with this initial analysis of how councils want to control the narrative when dealing with journalists just trying to do their job or residents putting on the pressure to get the services they deserve – the conclusion is that the system of local governance we have is not fit for purpose…

In an ideal world our local councils, officers and councillors alike, would see themselves as the servants of all the residents in the areas they cover. An integral part of that ethos would be a culture of transparency, accountability and a willingness to own up to and learn from mistakes. Well, we can all dream can’t we? As most of you are doubtless aware, the truth is a long way from this ideal. Here are just a couple of examples that illustrate how local councils operate on the basis of wanting to control the narrative. One concerns Thurrock Council’s media strategy that stymies local journalists wanting to ask them difficult questions, the other the refusal of Basildon Council to deal with independent resident groups.

In a recent blog post on Your Thurrock, the leader of the Thurrock Independents, Cllr. Luke Spillman, has taken Thurrock Council to task over the chilling…

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The Boro: Romford Return

Watching Premier League football is unaffordable for an increasing number of people. Non league football in an ideal world would be an attractive, alternative option. However, as any astute observers of the non league scene will be aware, too many clubs at this level are experiencing problems. This includes my home town club, Romford, who have been living a nomadic existence for too many seasons. So, the news that at long last they could be returning to Romford is very welcome.

Dave (the editor)

HAVERING SPECIAL

romford 001

In an era when many top-tier players get paid more in one day than a full-time minimum-wage worker takes home in a year, it is easy to be cynical and dismissive about modern football.  But in reality the Premier League is only one part of the footballing world – not that you would realise that if you go by the mainstream media’s coverage of the beautiful game.  In most cases lower division and non-league clubs are an important and cherished part of their local neighbourhood, helping towns develop and maintain a sense of community in these increasingly atomised times – as well as giving a boost to the local economy on matchdays.  With this in mind, it is great to hear that Romford FC could be soon returning to Havering.

Since the club’s re-founding in 1992 they have not had a permanent home, and at one point a bizarre…

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London’s Empty Housing: Causes, Existing Policy, Future Solutions and their Enforcement

This is a considerably longer read than we would normally post up on here. However, as we have written and said more times than we care to remember, what happens with the housing crisis in London has a direct impact on us out here in Essex. This piece looks at the root causes of that crisis, how existing policy does nothing to resolve it and puts on the table, some interesting ideas on how to change things…

architectsforsocialhousing

Duke Lodge in Holland Park, whose 26 rental apartments have stood empty since 2013, when it was bought by the Guernsey-based CPC Group, an offshore company owned by billionaire property developer Christian Candy. In 2016 planning permission was granted for the demolition of the block and its replacement with 5 interconnected villas with no affordable housing.

1. Empty Housing

In January of this year the Liberal Democrat Party published data gathered from Freedom of Information requests to 276 councils revealing not only the number of empty dwellings in the UK and how long they have been left empty, but the lack of action by local authorities to bring them back into use during a housing crisis that is causing increased housing poverty and homelessess. Over the past five years only 19 of the 247 councils in England and Wales that responded to the FOI requests have made use of the…

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50 Years of Resistance

We’re sharing this because it marks 50 years since the police set up a Special Demonstration Squad (SDS) after the protest against the Vietnam War in Grosvenor Square, London, that took place in July 1968. Setting up the SDS marked a new turn in the efforts of the state to disrupt protest and revolutionary movements. With the Undercover Policing Inquiry underway, this commemoration is important. This commemoration shouldn’t be seen as drawing a line under state infiltration and disruption of protest and revolutionary movements. The strategy and tactics of the state change according to the circumstances they find themselves in and how much of a spotlight is being placed on their attempts to disrupt us. This is an indication of one way they’re operating now: How Covert Agents Infiltrate the Internet to Manipulate, Deceive, and Destroy Reputations. With the Undercover Policing Inquiry, despite the efforts that are being made to frustrate the proceedings, state disruption of our movements is coming into the spotlight. Understandably the state would rather that wasn’t the case. Now think about the splits over various aspects of identity politics that are damaging the anarchist and other radical movements. It shouldn’t come as a surprise that some of us think that it’s more than a coincidence that the (unwanted from the state’s point of view) focus on state disruption of radicalism and the splits we’re witnessing are somehow connected.

Join hundreds of people in London on the 7th and 8th of July to celebrate 50 years of campaigns, struggles, resilience and success.

On the 7th of July we will be gathering from 12.30 pm at Grosvenor Square for a roll call of groups spied on.

On the 8th of July there will be a conference exploring five decades of movements for change, exhibitions, food, videos and talks at the Conway Hall. More information here.

WHY 50 YEARS OF RESISTANCE?

In 1968, following demonstrations against the Vietnam War in London’s Grosvenor Square, the police set up a Special Demonstration Squad (SDS). Since that time, 50 years ago, over 1,000 groups campaigning in the UK for a better world have been spied on, infiltrated and targeted by political policing. Their protests and demonstrations are also subjected to ongoing police opposition and control to try to limit their effectiveness.

See here for the rest of this piece…

Keeping Havering Special?

The Tory administration at Havering Council being taken to task for their housing and planning policies. We’re pleased to see the Havering Special blog emerging on the scene – the more local blogs like this that spring up, the happier we’ll be:)

HAVERING SPECIAL

‘Keep Havering Special’ was the slogan that the local Conservatives used whilst campaigning here in Havering; they may claim it helped them pick up votes but in reality it was the Non-Voters Party who won.  The overall turnout was as low as ever – with a paltry 26.6% of eligible voters going to the polls in Gooshsays;  Upminster ward had the highest turnout, but even there the turnout was a not-very-impressive 45.47%. The reasons for this pitiful turnout may be discussed in a future post on this blog, but going back to the Tory slogan – what DOES it actually mean?

According to them, it means preserving the borough’s green spaces, avoiding over-development of (albeit much-needed) housing, and generally preventing the borough from looking like inner-city London – “letting Romford become a concrete jungle is something I will fight to stop!” as Romford MP Andrew Rosindell wrote in…

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Tesco Workers Strike at Dagenham Distribution Centre

This is a really thorough analysis from NOTES FROM BELOW about the strike at the Tesco distribution facility in Dagenham, the conditions workers have to endure and the potential for disruption if workers across the sector decide to get really militant.

By Achille Marotta

Warehouse operatives, drivers, and office workers at Tesco’s distribution centre in Dagenham were on strike for 24 hours from Thursday the 17th to Friday the 18th of May. The workers, organised in USDAW, are demanding a 15% pay increase against the company’s offer of 3%. Reps claim that the strike has had an effect on Tesco’s finances, as the warehouse is a central point in the distribution network of an enormous amount of necessary commodities. While the company could easily afford to give into the demanded £1.39 pay rise, it preferred to lose money re-organising its distribution network to prevent the Dagenham strike from becoming a beacon of struggle to its half a million employees. What is really at stake is the potential for a new movement in the modern centers of working class concentration.

For the rest of the article, see here.